How is Autism Diagnosed?

Since Autism varies from individual to individual, doctors rely on some basic, core behaviors to diagnose Autism. The earlier Autism is diagnosed, the more effective the treatment intervention can.  With more effective intervention comes better skills and less challenging behaviors, making the child with autism much more successful on a daily basis.

The behaviors that doctors look for in order to diagnose Autism include difficulty making friends or connecting with peers,  difficulty initiating or maintaining conversations; minimal patterns of interest – especially when they are abnormal in the amount of focus or intensity, sticking to an inflexible routine or pattern, such as in eating or dressing or other areas of life; staying very preoccupied with or focused on certain specific objects or subjects; using repetitive, stereotyped or unusual language; inability or impairment with regard to social play or imagination. 

Sometimes doctors use questionnaires along with other diagnostic tools.  Questionnaires and other screening tools rely on parents and/or caregiver’s experience and observations of the child.  This input is extremely important because there are many observations that parents and caregivers see on a day-to-day basis that will help the doctor determine helpful information that will enhance the doctor’s evaluation, especially in areas where there might be a question.

Autism is complex and requires not only the child’s doctor, but a team approach including specialists such as a therapist, psychologist, psychiatrist, neurologist, speech therapist and others.  Usually, your child’s primary care physician will gather this team together.  Since Autism affects so many aspects of the individual’s life, having a team of specialists that can compare notes and work together should ensure that the individual is cared for in every aspect of the disease.  This will create the best chance for the biggest improvement.

For information on Autism two of the best resources are Autism Society of America at 1-800-328-8476 or on the web at www.autism-society.org and Autism Research Institute at 1-619-281-7165 or on the web at www.autismresearchinstitute.com.

Entry Filed under: Common Symptoms

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